Phanteks EVOLV ATX Tempered Glass Review

System Install

Given the very simple internal layout of the case, building a clean build is very easy with this case. For this review, I actually did two different builds in the case to showcase what you can achieve.

 

Build No. 1 was something that I felt most people will do. A simple build with an all in one cooler, and single GPU. You have about 68mm of DDR clearance when using a 120mm based cooling solution , or 48mm if using a 140mm based cooling solution in the top. I used some G-Skill Trident Z DDR4 memory, and those do not have any clearance issues with either the 120mm based coolers, or 140mm based coolers.

The build above has the following hardware in it:

  • Motherboard – Gigabyte X99 Ultra Gaming board
  • CPU – Intel i7-5820K
  • Memory – G-Skill 32GB 3200MHz DDR4
  • SSD – Samsung 950 PRO 512GB NVMe M.2 SSD. OCZ Vertex 240GB SSD in front just to showcase the front SSD mount.
  • PSU – Corsair AX1200i
  • GPU – NVIDIA GTX 1070 Founders Edition
  • Cooler – Corsair H100i
  • Cables – Phanteks Cable Extension Kit

 

Build No. 2, the Evolv ATX proves it is a great case for a custom loop build as well. The top of the case can easily fit a radiator up to 360mm long. I decided to go with a EX360 as I wanted a radiator that would feel proportional compared to the case. I could fit a thicker radiator, but that would have hidden a lot of the top of the board.

 

There is enough space in the case to install a tube reservoir or use a tube reservoir pump combo in the front of the case. I mounted my Aquacomputer combo res mount to the multi purpose mid-plate cover, and screwed the DDC pump directly to that plate. My pump and res combo are perfectly secured to the plate, and I have travelled with this build without any issues. Personally I would not use a tube reservoir taller than 110MM in this case as anything bigger will look and feel like it’s out of place.

 

Even with a skinny 35mm radiator, the VRM on the top of the board gets hidden. If you would like to showcase that part of your build, consider putting a radiator in the front of the case or go with air cooling. The front of the case an hold a 280mm radiator without removing the bottom HDD mount. But if you with a 360mm radiator in the front, you will have to remove the front HDD mount in order to install that radiator. Keep in mind that having a thick 360mm radiator up top, might causing you remove the bottom HDD mount even with a 280mm or a 240mm radiator as well.

Build No. 2 Specs:

  • Motherboard – Gigabyte X99 Ultra Gaming board
  • CPU – Intel i7-5820K
  • Memory – G-Skill 32GB 3200MHz DDR4
  • SSD – Samsung 950 PRO 512GB NVMe M.2 SSD. OCZ Vertex 240GB SSD in front just to showcase the front SSD mount.
  • PSU – Corsair AX1200i
  • GPU – MSI GTX 970 Gaming X in SLI
  • Cables – Phanteks Cable Extension Kit
  • Cooling – EK Waterblocks for cooling the CPU and the GPU
    • Swiftech MCP 35X pump mounted on an Aquacomputer DDC Res pump combo
    • PrimoChill Ghost white fittings
    • PETG Tubing
    • Deepcool fans on the XSPC EX360 radiator

The back of the case has about 35mm of cable management clearance, which is not a lot but enough for an average person to route the cables neatly. It took me a good 45 minutes to get my cables to the point they are now, and I spent another 15 minutes to clean them up after taking the pics as I wanted to put my two 3.5″ HDDs in the bottom.

 

Having decent wire management is important as the smoked tempered glass panel does not allow you to hide anything. And for those guys who complain about it, I say, “Take your time, and you can make the back of the case look really great”. With that said, I do wish that the length of the RGB SATA power connector would have been long so that a person can plug that under the PSU cover, and not have a SATA plug in the middle of the back (as pictured above).

Coming up next ….. Final Thoughts:

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