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InsolentGnome

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InsolentGnome last won the day on September 19

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About InsolentGnome

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    Just Plain Crazy
  • Birthday 08/05/1976

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    http://www.insolentmods.com

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    Male
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    Missouri-USA

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  1. InsolentGnome

    Logitech G413 LED Mod

    That would make fitting a transformer pretty easy. The only thing I'd have to say is get a good transformer. Some of them have a tendency to scream. The one I used in a case for some EL I wound up disconnecting because it was so annoying.
  2. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Thanks man! I'm pretty happy with it.
  3. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    And the final pics. Yeah, they're just in my shop but that's my style, LOL. Thanks for following along! And a huge thanks to:
  4. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Yeah, so some sort of stepping pulley setup would be a better option.
  5. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    I'm gonna have to look for something like that. I was wondering if a VFD setup would work. I've talked to Rod about how he set up one on his lathe. You might not like wires because you try to fit so much into tiny little boxes! LOL! I saw everything you were trying to cram into that A1!
  6. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    To continue with the tweaks, I decided that the res had to be lit up. It was pretty simple, Swiftech's Iris controller was all I needed and I happened to have one in a previous build. After yanking it out and cleaning up the wires, all I had to do was plug in the res's LED wire and I was in business. No LED And now with the LED set to white. I tried blue but it sort of washed out since there's a ton of blue already and the fluid is blue. White gives it a little umph and the res still glows blue with the fluid. With that sorted, I wanted to work on the wiring. I guess the difference between 2nd and 3rd at QuakeCon came down to cable management. Obviously I lost that battle, though I like a free flowing wire look. And from experience, I don't think a straight shot with combs from the mb connector to the PSU looks all that good. My first competition build had a laced set that ran like that and I still hate the way it worked out. So combs and lacing were definitely out of the question for me, since I'll be looking at it for a couple of years. I decided to try my hand at making cable guides out of 50/50 solder. It's easy to bend and work with, plus I had a spool, so that worked out well. First attempt was to spiral it around the wires. It was sort of 'meh' and didn't fit with the build at all. Oh yeah, and a pain in the butt to make it look right. Though I must admit, on the right build, it would look pretty cool. Second attempt was just to corral the wires with a loop of the solder. Basically a solder zip tie, loop it around and cut off the excess. I like that look so much better. It doesn't fight the feel of the build like the spirals did. I like that it's not really eye grabbing, but does the job, and it was pretty simple to do. It also gives me bundles of wires which I like the look of. And that pretty much buttons the case up. The tubing is still a bit off, but I'm OK with it and it's only noticeable from the right angles, the rest of the time it looks dead on. So I guess all that's left are the final pics and that will be the next update. Thanks for following along! Thanks to my sponsor:
  7. InsolentGnome

    Logitech G413 LED Mod

    I might be too late as well, but I'd use EL tape. Like EL wire, but it's flat. You'd have to find a way to hide the transformer, but you'd get a solid bar of light all the way around.
  8. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    After getting back from QuakeCon, I had some changes that I felt would improve the case. Normally I would have adjusted on the fly during the build, but being such a time crunch, I didn't have time to stand back and really look at how it was going. I had an end idea and I was just working towards it. Now with some breathing room, I can really look at it and tweak it. First thing was to tighten up the tubing. It was taking up a lot of room and even though I had managed to get all the tubing lined up with itself, it was a bit canted in relation to the case. Not bad but enough for me to know and that would drive me crazy. On the motherboard side, this just meant shortening the legs that went into the hardware. But on the GPU side I turned to 90's on the GPU block to pull the tubing in as far as I could. And while it was all drained down, I threw on the reservoir inlet tube that I had neglected to put on earlier. The sound of running water isn't always soothing, especially if you have to go to the bathroom. Part of the reason for tightening up the tubing was just that, tightening up the build giving it a cleaner look. But the other reason was that I wanted to lose the aluminum outer panels. This shrunk the case by over 2 inches side to side which made it fit on my desk better, but also really changed the look. I guess to me they were a bit distracting and unnecessary. The interior was already framed nicely by the veneered panels and they contrasted way too much, like running a ring of lights around the case, it just grabbed the eye way too much. To me this all works together better. Your eye isn't bombarded by a shiny ring and the veneer can really stand out. And now it's almost done, there are still a few tweaks that need to be done, taming the wiring a bit to clean it up and I'd like to redo a bit of the tubing again cause it's just not perfect yet. So until next update, thanks for following along! And my sponsor:
  9. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Makes a lot of sense. I'd like to set mine up to do metal, or just get one that's already set up for it. It's on my to do list, LOL. And thanks!
  10. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Continuing my push to get Deep Blue ready for QuakeCon, I needed to get my veneered panels shined up and ready before I got too far putting everything together. Even though the 3000 grit pads slicked everything up nice, I really wanted a shine. And after a lot of buffing, I got it. Also, somewhere in here I apparently cut my pass throughs into my panels and brushed them for a finished look. It was hectic trying to get everything done after spending a week polishing up the panels so I missed getting pics. Basically, I figured out where I needed a pass through, bookmarked the ends with a step bit and then connected them up. Switches also went in at this time, a couple of vandals that I had from another project mounted on the back of the tray area. It was about the only spot to put them where I could hide the business end and still access it when the side panels were on. Pics of them are in the final shots. I've also swapped out the fans and rads for the final combination of In Win Polaris fans on Hardware Labs stealth 360 radiators. I've had good luck with the Hardware Labs slim rads and even had a similar setup in Shinai. And they were virtually identical to the BP Leviathans even down to the m4 thread. I'm in love with the Polaris fans, a nice look, RGB but not annoying RGB, and the clear shrouds really let them light up the inside of a case. And the daisy chaining is the best thing ever. Next up was the loop. MNPCTECH hardline fittings, EK swivel 90's and Primochill 1/2" PETG. With the loop ready for fluid, I switch into wiring mode. I wanted to try something different and hopefully a lot easier, so I ditched the sleeve and ordered wire with blue insulation. I like that it's not as bulky as sleeved cables and is so much quicker to do. And also I could double up wires that were originally doubles so it didn't take any extra soldering. You're never going to end up with a system with 'perfect' wiring, but I like more of a free flow look to my wires so it suits me just fine. And then leak testing. And with no leaks I filled it with Mayhems UV blue and set about getting it ready to play on at QuakeCon. And then after a 10 hour drive, the last of it being in a torrential downpour, we made it to QuakeCon. Deep Blue made it onto stage and took 3rd in the US Modding Championship against some awesome scratch builds. Would have liked to have done better, but I knew that there were a few tweaks that it needed to compete better. But still 3rd isn't bad. Can't tell if it's a giant Dave or a mini Dewayne. So it was a good run and a fun time at QC, but I've still got some work to do. Thanks for following along and check back to see what's next. Thanks to my sponsor:
  11. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    How many bandsaws does one Mosquito need???
  12. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    The next part of the project was probably the hardest. In order to continue on, I had to take apart my baby, Shinai. It's been through a few variations, but it's still my favorite build. Down to the rads, fans, res and pump. It's definitely getting a place on a shelf though, I can't NOT display it. With the hardware pulled, I could start working on mounting it in it's new home. \ But first, I've got to do something about that red and white accent on the Gigabyte G1 Gaming board. That's better. And with a bit of sanding, I got the anodized finish off the top of the sinks, leaving the black in the crevasses. This will work much better. And frankly, isn't gaudy. I'd already gotten rid of the I/O shield, now it's transformation to an adult's board is complete. And then to do the layout on the back. Originally I was going to hide the SSDs between the tray panels because I was looking at a GTX980Ti SLI setup. Luckily, I stumbled across(ie won in a raffle) a 1080Ti. This made the cabling easier and my frames better but left me with a lot of space to fill on the back side. So SSDs, meet back panel. I'm a big fan of having the option to upgrade in a mod, even though most of the cases I've done have no possibility for upgrades. But this is my personal rig and I plan to use it for at least a couple of years, so upgrading is important. So to mount all this hardware on the back of the tray without punching a bunch of holes in it that I'd have to figure out how to cover later, I decided to take a blurry picture...of an intermediary panel. This panel will allow me to mount everything without tearing up the veneer and tray, so if I ever want to change the layout or hardware, I just cut a new aluminum panel. Before I get too far into mounting things, I did have to slap on some blocks. The Swiftech SKF with MNPCTECH fittings. I still love those things. And the ECO block on the 1080Ti. To mount the GPU, I did have to "modify" the backplate that came with the Swiftech block. I plotted out some locations for mounting studs that gave me the most clearance from the board. Then I drilled out the holes and countersunk some flat head screws, screwing them into standoffs that I can then mount to my panel. Using a similar technique with standoffs on the SSDs, I was ready to go. And voila! Also got the mb mounted. A lot of the rest was just figuring how to mount things up. Next was mounting the PSU with a piece of angle aluminum and a tab to hold the front side down since the V1200 is a bit heavy and mounting it with angle only gave me 2 screws to work with. And then mounting that giant res was pretty straightforward. Drill holes, tap, mount. You might be wondering now how I was expecting to run the extension cable for the GPU. And so was I. I didn't have time to order one so I started digging around and came up with a 400mm that would reach. The one good thing about building a couple crazy mods here and there is you wind up with some unusual stuff that just might come in handy. The only problem was the connector. It would have to go through the panel the GPU was mounted to and through the veneered panel as well. First task was getting it through the panel. I took a step bit, drilled a couple of holes and then connected the dots. And with that done, it was time for a break. Thanks for following along! And thanks to my sponsor:
  13. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Hahaha! I thought you got your own.
  14. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Oh boy, how does this work again? *thump thump thump* Is this thing on? So it's been a while and I figured I should probably up date this beast. While working on the polishing, etc., I reached out to Swiftech for some possible water cooling goodness. They did me a solid and hooked me up with the good stuff. First off, a SKF CPU block. I have the heirloom version on Shinai right now and I'd just carry it over, but it being red meant that it didn't really match the blue. The straight black and silver will match where I'm going with the motherboard. Next up, an ECO block for the 1080ti that I'm currently running stock. I've always loved the look of this block. And the part that I had to have no matter what because it just fits the case, a new Maelstrom 300mm reservoir. I knew as soon as I saw these come out that I was using one in this case. This thing is ginormous, so it fits right in with the case. With the wc parts in, it was time to start putting it all together. You'll notice there are some extra holes on my panels... I knew I was gonna need some interior panels to hold everything so these holes are for the mod blocks to attach those panels. For the front and top locations of the radiators, I went with .05" aluminum since it would be enough to hold the rads and fans, and for the bottom panel .09" aluminum since it would be holding 300+mm of reservoir and pump. And with all the mounting figured out and the panels installed. I also needed some panels to cover the gap between the front and back of the motherboard tray, which also help stiffen it up as well. I'll be going back in to cut some wire pass throughs once I figure out where all the wires need to go, LOL! I knew the layout of the interior I wanted, but I needed to lay it all out and get my positioning just right with the radiators and the reservoir. Part of this was to get the look right, but I also wanted to make sure that I got the top fitting from the res lined up with my radiator outlet so my tubing would be easier down the road. With that figured out, I could mount up my rads. I considered doing something funky with the cutouts but since this was all in a bit of a time crunch and they were set deep in the front and only visible from straight on, I went functional over fancy. I laid out my rads with some Bitspower Leviathan 360's I had from previous builds. A nice slim rad with a useful multi port setup. Unfortunately that multi port is a problem when mounting them to a flat panel. The plugs for the extra ports keep them from setting flat on the panel. My hope of using some of the parts I had laying around to 1) use up some of the stuff and 2) save some change wasn't gonna fly. But more on that later. Thanks for following along! Thanks to my sponsor as well:
  15. InsolentGnome

    Deep Blue(formally G-Frame) - Scratch Build (completed)

    Yeah, so I've been a bit distracted lately. An InWin 301 project, two 303's, a trip to Taiwan and then Indiana(talk about polar opposites), starting a new fiberglass repair business, aaaand cleaning out the shop behind my house to move my business to so I can stop paying rent for where I'm at now. Jesus, I'm going crazy. Slowly but surely I've been working on getting the side panels just right so I can continue on with the frame project. QuakeCon being in a month is definitely a motivator now as well. So let's get into the build...I liked the panels. But with just the shellac, they weren't shiny enough. And you know, who doesn't want to spend a month spraying clear and sanding? That was the first coat of I'm not even sure how many coats. Three, maybe four rounds of clear with a sanding in between the coats. Why so many coats? There were a few high spots here and there and I wanted to fill in any chips, etc. What really added to the time was laying them down and only clearing one side at a time, but this also allowed me to really lay on the clear. And the color was looking awesome. After getting all the coats I wanted on one side, I taped it off so I could clear the other side without dealing with a lot of overspray. In between coats I was using 220 and 320 grit paper to knock the clear down fast, on this last round, it was pretty smooth to start with so I went with 800 for my first pass. I figure less chance of missing scratches that compound won't get out. After the 800 grit, I went to 1000 grit and 3000 grit with my new toy. I've got an air 3" polisher, but it was so nice not having to listen to the compressor kick on. My new fiberglass repair business has it's perks. Now don't worry, after all that sanding, I'm totally going to hit them with some compound to get them sparkling, but for now, they're shiny enough. And I need something to do while the router is running later anyways. While getting the panels ready, I re-thought my threaded rod idea. It's just such a pain to thread everything on and I figured there had to be a source for 1/4" studs out there. While looking, I ran across 1/4" set screws which hadn't even crossed my mind, but they're perfect. Now with everything sanded and the set screws in hand, I can do some assembly and get some measurements for the next pieces I have to make. The thing is turning into a monstrosity, but at least it's a good looking monster, LOL! Thanks for following along y'all!
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