Hello Munky,

If you have been having any issue registering, or logging in please email kyle@themodzoo.com.

Sorry for any inconvenience caused!

Welcome to The Mod Zoo

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more! This message will be removed once you have signed in.

Search the Community: Showing results for tags 'noctua'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Pin Board
    • Announcements
    • Giveaways
  • The Mod Zoo Official Podcasts & Weekly Staff Hangout
    • Official Podcast Episodes
    • Questions and Discussion!
    • Weekly Staff Hangout
  • Tech News
    • Latest Tech News
    • 2015 CES Consumer Electronics Show Coverage
    • 2016 CES - Consumer Electronics Show Coverage
    • 2017 CES - Consumer Electronics Show Coverage
  • Project Central
    • The Mod Zoo Staff
    • Featured Projects
    • Member Worklogs
    • Maker or Non-PC Worklogs
  • TMZ Review Central
    • Reviews
  • PimpRig / PCApex Alumni Community
    • PimpRig / PCApex General Discussion
    • PimpRig / PCApex Member Project Logs
    • PimpRig / PCApex Member Project Archives
  • The Picnic Area
    • General Discussion
    • Drawing Board
    • The Water Park
    • Member Reviews and Unboxings
    • The Machine Shop
    • Modding Guides
    • Repair Guides
    • Overclocking
    • Recomended Ebay sellers
    • Comments & Suggestions
  • Food Court
    • The Mod Zoo Gift Shop
    • MNPCTech
    • Smart Computer Store
    • Spotswood Computer Cases
    • !nverse
    • ZOTAC
    • Bitfenix
    • Mayhems
    • Fractal Design
    • CaseLabs
    • EK Waterblocks
    • ModMyMods
    • WATERCOOL Quality Cooling Equipment
  • The Storage Area
    • Phenoptix
    • DazMode
    • Blade Works
    • Lutro0 Customs
    • Mod Zoo iRacing League
    • Ice Dragon Cooling
    • E22

Found 8 results

  1. Monore - By August

    Greetings! This is the start of my new project with the name of Monore. This project is going to be based in the Jonsbo UMX3 case and the whole build will circle around its clean & sleek look. I would like to start with a huge thank you to my sponsors for this project. Ocaholic Seasonic Jonsbo Gigabyte Noctua The Components: MOBO: Gigabyte Z170M-D3H CPU: Intel i7 6700k GPU: GTX 980Ti RAM: Kingston 4x4GB DDR4 SSD: TBA PSU: Seasonic Snow Silent 1050W CASE: Jonsbo UMX3 FANS: Noctua COOLING: Bitspower & Watercool The Project: This build is going to consist of various modifications, although some of them may not be declared at this time, this PC is going to stand in as my editing/main computer, therefore it will be equipped with high-end hardware and a full watercooling loop to keep the temperatures low. The case bottom compartment is going to be remodelled to house a 240mm radiator, a vented shroud is going to cover this part to keep the case as simplistic as possible. As I might run into trouble with the PSU mounting method with my ambitions for the case, this will most likely be altered too. Numerous small covers and shrouds are going to be created around the build to soften the esthetics of the build, as I want it to be elegant and simplistic. The colortheme for this build is going to be a bit interesting. I've chosen to go for a full black build with accents of beige (As in Noctua's fan frames). The PSU from Seasonic will be getting sleeved in beige and black aswell to fit the build even further. My plans are to paint and modifiy the outsides of the PSU to get rid of the white panels. As I stated earlier, many of the modifcations are not 100% decided at this time as a lot of ideas evolve as the build is being created. That's all for my introduction, here are a few pictures of the base components of this build! That is all for this introduction, next week will be packed with a more ellaborate view of the case and hopefully a few other components. See you then! -August Lindgren
  2. My first water cooling build was a roller coaster of a learning experience to say the least. It seems like every time I'd get a package of parts in the mail I'd realize that I'm missing yet another piece or I'd find some new component that I absolutely had to have. When all was said and done I called my baby GrayGhost. After finishing "him" I began browsing the modding forums and getting the itch to do a case mod. This is my first attempt to mod a case into something that carries my design aesthetic and hopefully keeps a decent build quality although modding with limited tools and space is always a huge obstacle. GrayGhost 1.0 I am a designer by trade so I am planning on building a system that is a bit different and interesting yet manages to remain understated and quiet. Recently the Parvum R1.0 and Corsair 600C have caught my eye because of their inverted motherboard layout. The only problem being money is tight and I told myself I would not buy a new case until after the Broadwell-E processors are released. Until then I dug around I realized I already owned a Define R5 and a Cooler Master Elite 110. I wouldn't have any issues chopping up either of them since they were only collecting dust. Needless to say, due to size restraints, I decided to begin a modding project using the Fractal Design Define R5. Hardware: Case: Fractal Design Define R5 CPU: Intel i7-4770k Mobo: Asus Z97-AR RAM: G.Skill Sniper 16GB 1866 DDR3 (2x8GB) GPU: Asus GTX 970 Strix (x2) SSD: Samsung 950 Pro M.2 512GB SSD: Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB HDD: Western Digital Green 3TB PSU: Corsair AX860 CPU Block: EK Supremacy EVO - nickel GPU Block: EK Full-Cover - nickel (x2) GPU Backplate: EK retention backplate - black (x2) Radiators: Hardware Labs Black Ice Nemesis 280GTS (x2) Fans: Noctua NF-P14s Redux-1200 PWM - 140mm (x6) Reservoir: Barrow quartz glass - 170mm Pump: EK D5 vario Top: EK-XTOP Revo - Plexi Fittings: EK & Barrow - matte black Tubing: Alphacool HardTube 10/12mm Carbon Coolant: Mayhems X1 - custom mixed color Lighting: Darkside Connect UV LED's & NZXT Hue+
  3. Much to the joy of fan enthusiasts, Noctua announced their Redux and IndistrialPPC lines a little over two years ago. Both of these lines would offer fans of the renowned fans a long clamored-for feature: a non-brown option. Noctua has recently decided to build on the IndustrialPPC line via a 24V fan line as well as expand its color options with Chromax accessory packs. You can check out the review here!
  4. The End

    Like the purple sky at dusk, before a mid night storm, an ominous sign. Sometimes the end is but another beginning, but the new beginning may be in another world. Sometimes we make a decision that changes everything. And with that, begins the worklog of my final casemod. Why my final? I'm almost 30, I have three children, a long term partner, and a plan. It's time I moved on from certain things, mainly because of budgeting - money and time. Hardware: Corsair 230T Rebel Orange, windowed Gigabyte 970A-D3P Motherboard CPU - meh, whatever I can afford, currently a 555BE Phenom GPU - unknown brand HD5870 Eyefinity6 Edition 2GB Memory: 8GB Corsair Sound: Sound Blaster 24Bit Ethernet: eBay special GbE card CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 GPU Cooler: Thermalright Spitfire Fan Controller: NZXT Sentry LX Hard Drives: 2x Hitachi 250gb 2.5", 1x ASUS DVD-RW, and whatever else I find and throw in The case: The window cut: The painting: The test fit: The GPU: The Hardware Layout: Getting closer: More to come, maybe a PSU change, plus final assembly. I plan on finishing this before the end of October.
  5. Colour choices

    Hey folks. I have been working on a Corsair 230t windowed edition (in rebel orange). However final colour scheme eluuuuudes me! Main elements: Carbon/black shakmods sleeve Noctua NH-D15 CPU cooler Thermalright Spitfire gpu cooling set NZXT Sentry LX fan controller Choice of: Black frame, orange blade Thermaltight 150mm fans OR 150mm Noctua brown/beige fans I don't mind the noctua colours at all, but black and orange is my colour scheme, albeit it's probably about time I tried something different. The modded case, ready for paint, is: My colour choices come from this chart: http://mmpindustrial.com.au/images/stories/charts/ae-spray_paint_colourchart.pdf So far I'm trying to decide between: Black interior, 'International Orange' exterior (with black front) Black interior, 'Mission Brown' and 'Heritage cream' exterior (with black front) - Noctua colours. Using existing lines in the chassis for splitting the colours Black interior, 'Plum Purple' exterior (with black front) Any suggestions would be appreciated :)
  6. It's the start of a new year, and since it's MY section I figure I can chop the massive GG thread up into more manageable bits. (and I haven't had a chance to sort through the 1000 + pics and stuff.) -When we last left our hero, he was fighting Ming's atomic robots- Wait... No, I was mounting a shroud on the side of the recently RMA'd power supply. Here I've removed the label so I'd have a nice indented spot for... wait for it... velcro. A great way to remove tape residue is with some naphtha on toilet paper - if you don't smoke. -POW! Real quick, and the paint is intact. :D/> -Currently, I'm making little holes so I can sneak wires into the motherboard cover. -Before I can cover the motherboard, I need to make a little room for one... Time to tame the octopus. -Some idiot didn't rotate his pictures. Here I've cut unwanted wires, and have marked the wires I want with what I want them for. -First, I sure didn't need a foot of cable for each drive. A little black paint takes care of any exposed red or yellow. -Now to cannibalize the low speed cables that came with the Noctua fans. To get those pesky male pins out, jam a paperclip in the hook side of the connector well. Don't so this with a live connector, of course, you have to lick those first. I had a Maalox moment for a bit when I noticed the PCI connectors were wire coded like there were 2 rails. Two cords had silver/yellow, two were normal. It hasn't burst into flames yet, so I guess all is well. I used the extra PCI wires to save space. I didn't need any 5 volt wires, after all. -I saved a few of the tach wires. -No real speed control, though.. just a, "why, yes. You do have a fan." -Looks fine to me. This was, what... a week after RMA? That'll bite me in the ass later. The PSU in Bloo tanked already too. -Ooh Yeah, a slim,sexy, two-wire molex connector for the pump. Guess where that came from. While buying shrink wrap, I made an impulse buy to check out something Brother Mach taught us... Yep. 1/4" lamp fittings ARE compatible with G1/4 fittings. :D/> If you can get them in solid brass it means that everything you need to make a badass metal reservoir can be found at the hardware store. I'd like to thank my sponsors here for all their support. :D/> RIP
  7. Well, Hell hath finally froze over. Noctua is rolling out some grey fans, the Redux line, instead of their signature brown-on-brown combo. I think they mentioned this at CES or another big trade show recently, nice to see them making good on their word. "The redux edition comprises both 4-pin PWM and 3-pin versions of NF-P14, NF-S12B, NF-B9 and NF-R8, all of which are proven, time-tested models that have convinced thousands of customers and helped to found Noctua’s reputation as a first-tier supplier of premium grade low noise cooling equipment. Altogether, there will be 13 redux models with speeds ranging from 700 to 1700rpm." They also have an industrial line hitting the market with black fans and brown trim. Costlier and tailored to heavy use and abuse. "The industrialPPC line features ruggedised 2000 and 3000rpm versions of the award-winning NF-F12 and NF-A14 fans. Their fibre-glass reinforced polyamide construction and certified water and dust protection (up to IP67) make the industrialPPC fans an ideal choice for highly demanding applications that require superior flow rates and ultimate dependability." Press release at Noctua.at
  8. Table of Contents 01. 2013-NOV-13: First Hardware Testing & The Noctua NH-U9DX 1366 02. 2013-NOV-16: Temporary Ghetto Setup, OS Installed 03. 2014-APR-01: Mounting the PSU & Ghetto-testing the LSI Controller 04. 2014-APR-02: The Disk Racks 05. 2014-APR-08: Chipset Cooling & Adventures in Instability 06. 2014-APR-09: Disk Ventilation 07. 2014-APR-11: Fan Unit for Main Compartment Ventilation 08. 2014-APR-12: Storage Topology & Cabling 09. 2014-APR-26: Storage and Networking Performance 10. 2014-MAY-10: Sound Dampening & Final Pics Wait, What, and Why? So, yeah, another build. Another server, to be precise. Why? Well, as nice of a system ZEUS is, it does have two major shortcomings for its use as a server. When I originally conceived ZEUS, I did not plan on using ZFS (since it was not yet production-ready on Linux at that point). The plan was to use ZEUS' HDDs as single disks, backing up the important stuff. In case of a disk failure, the loss of non-backed up data would have been acceptable, since it's mostly media files. As long as there's an index of what was on the disk, that data could easily be reaquired. But right before ZEUS was done, I found out that ZFS was production-ready on Linux, having kept a bit of an eye on it since fall 2012 when I dabbled in FreeBSD and ZFS for the first time. Using FreeBSD on the server was not an option though since I was nowhere near proficient enough with it to use it for something that important, so it had to be Linux (that's why I didn't originally plan on ZFS). So, I deployed ZFS on ZEUS, and it's been working very nicely so far. However, that brought with it two major drawbacks: Firstly, I was now missing 5 TB of space, since I had been tempted by ZFS to use those for redundancy, even for our media files. Secondly, and more importantly, ZEUS is not an ECC-memory-capable system. The reason this might be a problem is that when ZFS verifies the data on the disks, a corrupted bit in your RAM could cause a discrepancy between the data in memory and the data on disk, in which case ZFS would "correct" the data on your disk, therefore corrupting it. This is not exactly optimal IMO. How severe the consequences of this would be in practice is an ongoing debate in various ZFS threads I've read. Optimists estimate that it would merely corrupt the file(s) with the concerned corrupt bit(s), pessimists are afraid it might corrupt your entire pool. The main focus of this machine will be: room to install more disks over timeECC-RAM capablenot ridiculously expensivelow-maintenance, high reliability and availability (within reason, it's still a home and small business server)Hardware The component choices as they stand now: M/B: Supermicro X8DT3-LN4FRAM: 12 GB ECC DDR3-1333 (Hynix)CPUs: 2 x Intel L5630 Quad Cores, 40 W TDP eachCooling: 2 x Noctua NH-UD9X 1366 (yes, air cooling! :o )Cooling: A few nice server double ball bearing San Ace fans will also be making an appearance.Case: InWin PP689 (will be modded to fit more HDDs than in stock config)Other: TBDModding Instead of some uber-expensive W/C setup, the main part of actually building this rig will be in modifying the PP689 for fitting as many HDDs as halfway reasonable as neatly as possible. I have not yet decided if there will be painting and/or sleeving and/or a window. A window is unlikely, the rest depends mostly on how much time I'll have in the next few weeks (this is not a long-term project, aim is to have it done way before HELIOS). Also, since costs for this build should not spiral out of control, I will be trying to reuse as many scrap and spare parts I have laying around as possible. Teaser More pics will follow as parts arrive and the build progresses, for now a shot of the case: (click image for full res) That's all for now, thanks for stopping by, and so long. :)