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E.E.L. Ambiense

The "that's impossible but true" watercooling-failure thread!

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Yikes....anyone should know that if the pump is sucking air you are asking for a bad time.

On an even more bonehead moment, most pumps name the fluid they pump. Cavitation is bad. He made a cool looking vaccum though.

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Thankfully, it was only a Jingway...  :rolleyes:

 

:lol:

Ironically, it probably survived that shit because it was a Jingway. DDC have that little rubber thing to kill. Jingway have nylon bushings that will take some of the torture. -Then you start cutting into the housing. I've tortured a few aquarium pumps, but never totally killed one.

I bet it rattled like mad after that, though. (I bet it rattled straight out of the box too.)

 

 

 

Edit: Have we mentioned wiring them backward is bad yet?:D

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:lol:

Ironically, it probably survived that Poopadilly because it was a Jingway. DDC have that little rubber thing to kill. Jingway have nylon bushings that will take some of the torture. -Then you start cutting into the housing. I've tortured a few aquarium pumps, but never totally killed one.

I bet it rattled like mad after that, though. (I bet it rattled straight out of the box too.)

 

 

 

Edit: Have we mentioned wiring them backward is bad yet? :D

Rubber thing? You mean the cup for the ceramic bearing (which, IIRC, is some sort of carbon material)? Anyway, yeah, the tiny bearing surfaces in the DDC and D5 pumps really don't like being run dry...

 

Also, I don't remember the bearing setup in the Jingway pumps involving Nylon... they have a ceramic impeller shaft, but I can't recall the composition of the material that rides the shaft.

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I swear some of the earlier Jings I disassembled had nylon in there but it's been quite awhile.  When Eddy K was at work a few months back I chatted with him about the Jingways and he mentioned the ceramic shaft, but don't recall anything about nylon though.

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-Could be senility kicking in in the case of the Jing, but most shaft-mount types have a sacrificial bearing ring or 2.

(And YES, I know I'm talking with a couple of pros, and you probably think I'm high.:D)

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-Could be senility kicking in in the case of the Jing, but most shaft-mount types have a sacrificial bearing ring or 2.

(And YES, I know I'm talking with a couple of pros, and you probably think I'm high. :D)

Good stationary shaft designs tend to be comprised of a stationary ceramic shaft, front & rear ceramic thrust washers (though, I've also come across thrust bearings, weird wave disc spring assemblies, and the occasional sacrificial plastic spacer), and some form of carbon wear surface as part of the impeller assembly. The Laing pumps ditch the whole shaft/thrust washer setup by using a ceramic ball and designing the pump such that the rotor-stator magnetic couple pulls and holds the rotor on the ball. This introduces axial load on the assembly but allows the rotor/impeller to respond to radial forces by tilting. It's radial loading that usually ruins cheap stationary shaft designs (the wear material in the rotor gives out).

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Rubber thing? You mean the cup for the ceramic bearing (which, IIRC, is some sort of carbon material)? Anyway, yeah, the tiny bearing surfaces in the DDC and D5 pumps really don't like being run dry...

 

Also, I don't remember the bearing setup in the Jingway pumps involving Nylon... they have a ceramic impeller shaft, but I can't recall the composition of the material that rides the shaft.

lol rides the shaft. Sorry. This has been my immature moment for the day :P

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Good Lord! EEL and I both missed that?!!? You got WAY too technical there! :lol:

I've seen a lot of aquarium units grind themselves through the housings. I've had one balance failure like you are talking about too. The shaft ground into the inner edge of the magnet about 1/16 of an inch.

..Then there was one that ate a rock and assploded. I'm not sure if there's an engineering-friendly term for "assploded." That's when shit goes everywhere.

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lol rides the shaft. Sorry. This has been my immature moment for the day :P

 

Good Lord! EEL and I both missed that?!!? You got WAY too technical there! :lol:

 

I was wondering how long it would take for someone to pick up on that one...  :ph34r:

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Good stationary shaft designs tend to be comprised of a stationary ceramic shaft, front & rear ceramic thrust washers (though, I've also come across thrust bearings, weird wave disc spring assemblies, and the occasional sacrificial plastic spacer), and some form of carbon wear surface as part of the impeller assembly. The Laing pumps ditch the whole shaft/thrust washer setup by using a ceramic ball and designing the pump such that the rotor-stator magnetic couple pulls and holds the rotor on the ball. This introduces axial load on the assembly but allows the rotor/impeller to respond to radial forces by tilting. It's radial loading that usually ruins cheap stationary shaft designs (the wear material in the rotor gives out).

 

...and that is why Alex is a god in the w/c circles.  hahaha, that's awesome.

 

 

Not really a w/c fail, but more of a w/c packaging fail:

post-3-0-75627300-1415736570_thumb.jpg

 

I guess they have Black Chrone's Disease?  *bah dum tsst*

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Aww, I wanted to make the joke about the third nipple.:(

Bitspower packaging fails will never beat the zip-lock baggie: Zip/retail hook hole/ heat seal. -classic.

I wish I could post the thread where the guy dismantled $200 of rotary fittings. It was painful.

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Hahah, sorry bro.  It wrote itself. 

 

hook hole

LOL.  "Hey Jerry!  Let's go down to the redlight-district and pick up some hook holes!"

 

Hahah, $200 worth of rotaries?  Hell, if they're Bits rotaries....you just have to wait a little while.  *ba dum tsst!*

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Now that the case has been completely settled, I'll light up this thread again with a case wherein a computer actually ... lit up, so to speak. This actually happened to my wife and I back in May, several days after Memorial Day. I don't have any pictures or video of the flames, only pictures of the aftermath.

DSC_0672.jpg
DSC_0665.jpg
DSC_0680.jpg

These pictures and others were sent off to the manufacturer along with the water block.

To summarize what happened based on the investigation: a crack developed in the outlet on the water block that became a very slow leak. Eventually either the crack got big enough or enough fluid built up inside the lid of the block that it leaked out onto the mainboard components directly below, causing a short and ignition. Thankfully the flames were short-lived and the situation wasn't worse. This incident occurred about 8 weeks post-installation and AlphaCool's insurance company reimbursed me for the components that needed to be replaced, the water block and the cost to ship it to Germany for investigation -- around $400 in total.

 

So at least it all worked out in the end.

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Yikes... that's why I don't leave my desktop running 24/7 like I did in college (and also because I pay the power bill now lol). Good to hear that Alphacool's insurance covered it though. I'm in the process of fighting a company for insurance (non-computer related) and it's turning out to be quite a pain...

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Jeez, that sucks. 

 

Yeah those ACool blocks have had issues in the past.  So o-ring wasn't sealing in the corner there?  I've seen a few that had cracks on the G1/4 ports because of the mill design on inside of block top only affording a small amount of threads for fittings to catch on to, and people were over-cranking fittings on the port stressing the material.

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Kerosine makes for a terrible coolant.:D

 

I had a case do that to me long ago. The maker zip-tied all the wires to some of the razor-sharp metal inside. 3 seconds into the first boot it burst into flame. -Worst $10 I ever spent.:lol:

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Jeez, that sucks. 

 

Yeah those ACool blocks have had issues in the past.  So o-ring wasn't sealing in the corner there?  I've seen a few that had cracks on the G1/4 ports because of the mill design on inside of block top only affording a small amount of threads for fittings to catch on to, and people were over-cranking fittings on the port stressing the material.

 

I was using an AlphaCool rotary fitting on the outlet, and those things are hard enough to get in place by hand. Didn't use any tools on it, though. I guess when I was trying to get the fitting tubed up it may have just been a little too much for it.

 

But I don't think it was a bad o-ring, but a bad design to the block. If you look for pictures of that block taken apart, and look at how the threads are oriented with the o-ring, a crack on the wrong side of the outlet will likely leak coolant into the lid, outside the o-ring. After that it's only a matter of time before the coolant leaks out of the lid and onto your components.

 

That block was the XP3 Light Plexi, and I think the acetal tops would've been a little better. I changed over to Koolance for the CPU block when building her new loop, and I went with Koolance when building out my loop as well.

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