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jakings238

bits power fittings/tubing parts.

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Hi All,

I have a question regarding bitspower fittings/correct tubing.
I want to be using the bitspower fittings such as 90 degree rotatory fittings and other various angled attachments.

I have already bought a couple of 1/4 fill ports so I want to stick with the 1/4 attachment size. I do find it a little confusing though which pipe to use....

Would someone please provide me with the links to the correct attachments/tubing.

if you could use scan.co.uk/overclockers.co.uk for the links that would be much appreciated.


I've also seen people use some sort of metal piping? If anyone knows what pipe to use for that I'd also appreciate the links for that too (preferably ebay.co.uk)

I will be using crystal link to link up the spaghetti junction of connectors on the motherboard like the guy from singularity computers does - http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/1eGY5B8mJmY/mqdefault.jpg
so the fittings will have to be compatible with the crystal link tubing.

It will also connect to/through two of these eventually:
http://www.scan.co.uk/products/3gb-evga-gtx-780-hydro-copper-28nm-pcie-30-6008mhz-gddr5-gpu-980mhz-boost-1033mhz-cores-2304-dp-dvi-


If any more info is required in order for you to answer my question please let me know.

Kind Regards,
Chris

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Your question is a difficult one to answer because each system will be different and require different fitting types and lengths. I think you are refering to G1/4, correct me if I am wrong, this is the standard thread size used. G3/8 is the other size I have seen available, Just be sure to get the same otherwise they will not play well togather. 90 degree and 45 degree are the basic angles you will need. Always try and get the rotary style, this will help you line up your connections correctly.  

 

You say you are goling to be using crystal link so you will need 12mm piping and the multi link adapters. If you want to go with metal piping use 12 mm Copper pipe with the multi link adapter.

 

Sorry if I did not provide the informaiton you are looking for, as I said the fittings, extensions, and connectors will very from system to system.

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Hi Chris, Welcome to the Zoo.

 

Everything you order, fittings wise, should be G1/4 these days.  It'll say it iin the product description of any site you buy it from as well, so that will help.

 

For tubing, what matters is the ID (Inner diameter) and the OD (outer diameter).   This correlates directly to the barbs or compression fittings that you order as well.  So, if you order 1/2 ID 3/4 OD fittings, you would want to order 1/2 ID 3/4 OD tubing.  I highly recommend Tygon tubing.  There are of course other sizes out there for fittings and tubing, so don't just limit yourself to 1/2 ID 3/4 OD, as that's probably the largest of the fittings/tubing out there.  You could go smaller.

 

For copper pipe, you'll need a few things:

Bitspower C47 or C48 fittings OR Primochill Ghost Fittings (you could also use stuff from you local hardware store as long as they're G1/4 threaded)

Copper Pancake Coil.  This is copper tubing that comes in a large coil, usually 50 feet to 100 feet.

Tubing Cutter (for copper)

Tubing bender that fits the dimensions of your tubing.

 

The problem with using the bitspower fittings, if you're in America, is that they have 12mm holes for the pipe to be inserted into.  12mm copper in the USA isn't cheap (about twice as expensive as 1/2 OD copper tubing).  But since you're in the UK, it shouldn't be an issue.

 

The Primochill Ghost fittings, on the other hand, go by  ID/OD standards.  They have a OD of 1/2.  So, you can order copper pipe that is 1/2 OD, I think 50 feet of it runs about 50 bucks on every site I checked it out.

 

Hope that helps.

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If you want to do metal tubing the coiled tubing will not work. It tends to be slightly flattened which is bad for getting an O-ring seal. It's also a nightmare to straighten. Your local hardware store, (I THINK the UK is using 12mm outer diameter,) should have lengths of hardened copper pipe in the right size.

 

I think US pipe is measured by the inner diameter, which is part of what makes it a nightmare to work with/make fittings for.

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Thanks for your replies guys. so would I be right in saying the three following compnenets are compatible with each other?

 

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=WC-215-BP&groupid=962&catid=2589

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=WC-283-BP&groupid=962&catid=2589

https://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=WC-343-BP

http://www.scan.co.uk/products/33m-%2810ft%29-masterkleer-1-2-id-3-4-od-hose-clear-uv-blue-boxed

 

 

if so that should anser enough of my questions to be able to make sure all the right parts are ordered.

 

Thanks, for your help. I'm so glad I found these forums. You guys are so quick/helpful compared to other forums I've used.

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Cheapskate - I was wondering that about hard lining. As far as I know you can't really bend ridged copper? do they sell straight lengths of soft copper? Inquiring minds want to know.

Hi Chris Welcome, sorry to jump in the middle of your thread, but he brought up a question I wanted to know

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If you want to do metal tubing the coiled tubing will not work. It tends to be slightly flattened which is bad for getting an O-ring seal. It's also a nightmare to straighten. Your local hardware store, (I THINK the UK is using 12mm outer diameter,) should have lengths of hardened copper pipe in the right size.

 

I think US pipe is measured by the inner diameter, which is part of what makes it a nightmare to work with/make fittings for.

 

NEIN!

 

A lot of people actually use the copper coil as it's easy to bend but stays uniform and rigid.  US piping is actually measured by the OD specifically, though they do use the ID as well for flow.  Some even provide the "wall thickness."

 

Rigid (straight) pipe in itself isn't easy to bend, but I believe there are different tolerances to this (K, L, and M).

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@ onevoicewild - no problem, ask away :)

@ Sebar - oh my god that is so clean. I think I'm going to stick to crystal link/flexible tubing.

I would've liked solid copper pipes but it just seems so complex. I think bending the pipes will prove quite a challenege.

 

I may be new here but the project I have coming up is like nothing I've really seen on the forums! I'm sure you'll like it :)
 

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Use the search and your questions will be answered...

 

http://themodzoo.com/forum/index.php?/topic/149-pipebending-101/

 

It is far easier than you think.

 

If you are looking for specific advice then by all means PM me or leave your question in that thread.

 

Copper coil is not really advised unless you can get them in straights,the coils tend to have dings and stampings on them and are a pain to straighten. The only good way of straightening coil is a vice and a slide hammer,pinch one end in the vice and the other clamp to the slide hammer then hammer away till its straight.

 

You can use hardened coppper but you will need to anneal it slightly for bends.

 

I tend to use pre chromed toilet upstand pipe,its great to bend and is already straightened.

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Thanks sebar and B - I was going to reread your tutorial, thanks both. I do heat and air and have access to a top notch bender, but we always soldered of brazed everything so I've never done it.  I appreciate the good advise! that's our great asset around here, is the depth of experience of our members. Thanks guys!

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@Xnine - Are you talking about the industrial stuff? 'Cuz hardware store stuff is ID. I know they flip-flop at some point, but I haven't determined the boundary yet.

-Then there's that 'schedule' standard...

 

now that I think of it, Iron pipe is OD? Copper and pvc ID...

 

Ah, there it is. TUBING is ID (copper), (Steel)pipe is OD.

-No, That's shit too. What's written and what's in my garage are two different worlds. The pipe is measured ID too. How else do you explain a 1/2" pipe being 1" in diameter?

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Man this thread really took off. In the USA plumbers measure their copper pipe by ID and Refrigeration copper pipe is measured by OD.  There are different thickness's as previously stated. The thinnest Is DWV but I don't think they make it small enough to be useable for us. Normal sizes are M , K, L  if we are hard lining I think I am only concerned with the outside diameter so M would be preferable.  A lot of the sizes over lap 1/2" ID in M copper is the same OD as 5/8" OD      3/4"ID = 7/8" OD  Bla bla  Bla.  I don't know if they make it any more? but they used to run 3/4" boiler piping in a ridged nickel tubing.  It must have had just the right softness. All the turns were bent and it makes the most beautifully bent turns you can imagine.  Thanks for all the thoughts on this guys. I know more than I did before :)  

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@Xnine - Are you talking about the industrial stuff? 'Cuz hardware store stuff is ID. I know they flip-flop at some point, but I haven't determined the boundary yet.

-Then there's that 'schedule' standard...

 

now that I think of it, Iron pipe is OD? Copper and pvc ID...

 

Ah, there it is. TUBING is ID (copper), (Steel)pipe is OD.

-No, That's Poopadilly too. What's written and what's in my garage are two different worlds. The pipe is measured ID too. How else do you explain a 1/2" pipe being 1" in diameter?

 

From all of the websites I've gone to, ID and OD are listed, but OD is specifically mentioned in the title of the Pipe/tubing, so I'm sure they use both, and some even add exact wall thickness.

 

It's confusing as to what is the "standard" but I'm fairly certain they use OD at the initial measurement, than ID for the secondary.  I could be wrong, I'm no plumber or steel worker, but from all of the sites I've looked at for pricing

 

Yeah, by this chart (googled "American Pipe Standards") OD comes before ID or wall thickness.

http://academic.evergreen.edu/projects/biophysics/technotes/fabric/pipe.htm#schedule

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What was this thread about again? :lol:

 

Anyway, -Ever measure a 2x4? It's about 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" or less. It's the same with household plumbing.

 

@Jakings - Ignore our derailment. If you are in the UK, you should be able to go to a hardware store and ask for 12mm OD copper.

 

 

 

Edit: By the chart you linked, the OD of an 1/8" pipe is .405, Then the schedule listings continue with ID and wall thickness.

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