Jump to content

If you are having any issues logging in please contact: kyle@themodzoo.com

Recommended Posts

5, 6, 7, 8

 

Introducing my new project based on the thin mini-ITX form factor. Intel developed this thin version to support the AIO (All In One) PC market. It was in response to the popularity of the iMac which bundles the monitor and system into a single thin chassis.

 

I have other ideas for it.

 

 

 

001.jpg

After a 20-hour work marathon I put together this chassis. Wood of course. It is the medium I work in.

 

 

002.jpg

18 pieces of wood assembled onto a 1/16" sheet of birch plywood. The wood is all basswood (AKA lacewood) except the darker center piece. That is 1/4" thick maple.

 

 

003.jpg

Many of the boards, including the maple, are simply to stiffen the structure. 1/16" (1.6mm) plywood is easy to work with and keeps the project thin but needs a little help to prevent flexing.

 

 

004.jpg

Gigabyte offers three thin mini-ITX models This is the high-end H77 chipset version.

 

 

005.jpg

One of the tricks in keeping the board thin is use of laptop-style SODIMM memory

 

 

007.jpg

The thin mini-ITX I/O shield is exactly 1/2 the height of a standard ATX standard I/O shield. Some board makers include a full height shield to use in a standard chassis.

 

 

006.jpg

If you installed a "normal" heatsink onto a thin mini-ITX board it would no longer be thin. Intel makes this heatsink and AFAIK it is the only such product on the market.

008.jpg

 

009.jpg

The heatsink uses a blower instead of a more common axial fan. Blowers are typically noisier and less efficient but Intel spent some serious R&D on this bad boy. This is the first blower I have ever worked with that allows air intake from both sides simultaneously. Testing will be done.

 

 

 

010.jpg

 

011.jpg

 

 

Thanks for looking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh hell yeah! Love these little builds, and I love your wooden constructions (had to be careful with wording there lol). Can't wait!

Had been thinking about a "thin" board for a bedroom HTPC build. Had never seen that cooler before now, though. Looks like a great way to keep things thinn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Super tiny build... I like :)

A medium-sized build for me.  :)

 

Oh hell yeah! Love these little builds, and I love your wooden constructions (had to be careful with wording there lol). Can't wait!

Had been thinking about a "thin" board for a bedroom HTPC build. Had never seen that cooler before now, though. Looks like a great way to keep things thinn

There are some interesting barebones out there for thin mini-ITX that include big touchscreen monitors. It just looked interesting to me and a challenge. 

 

...And right off the bat, you build a chassis barely bigger than the mainboard. -You rule. :lol:

Thanks! That is the complete internal chassis. Now for the interesting part. 

 

This is awesome.  I would love to build up one of these for no other reason than trying to build the smallest PC I could. 

Building small is a worthy challenge and it can be fun. Also, they take up less space on my shelf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love your inventive spirit! your always bringing us something new. :)

Thank you.

 

The name brings about images of Art-Deco. I assume you'll be continuing your trend of that style with SFF rigs with this one? Sure hope so!

Some hard core Art Deco this time around.. I'll be checking a box by using a special style of Art Deco . One that I've never done before..Came close.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 
 
012.jpg
Working on the base. Wait.....what?
 
 
013.jpg
It is gonna be an "up and downer".
 
 
014.jpg
The backside will remain virgin. No screws, holes, paint. Nothing. This will match up to a similar surface in the cover.
 
  
015.jpg
Adding more material to complete the base structure.
 
 
016.jpg
Though it looks like a horizontal-stepped base it is actually made by building vertical steps.
 
 
017.jpg
I call them reversing pinwheel butt joints. Each layer reverses direction of the  joints and cause them to stagger back and forth across each other. Engineered strength. Veneer will hide the crudeness of the butt joints.
 
 
 
018.jpg
 
 
019.jpg
 
Thanks for looking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What, no dovetails on the small stock? :p

 

Looking good so far.  I like the vertical orientation.  Keeps desk space required to a minimum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What, no dovetails on the small stock? :P

 

Looking good so far.  I like the vertical orientation.  Keeps desk space required to a minimum.

I like the small footprint and the canvas space on both sides.  :)

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

At 30% completion...
 
020.jpg
 
 
021.jpg
 
 
025.jpg
 
 
026.jpg
 
 
027.jpg
 
 
028.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the use of the wood as a chassis.  Are you planning to stain it, clear coat or just leave it?

 

Cheers

 

Fen

Thanks. I don't use stain. I like to apply veneer and finish with a semi-gloss lacquer.

 

Wood work is awesome :)

 

And to paraphrase Zoolander.... "What is this, a computer for ants?!"   :D

Thank you.

 

This is awesome! VERY unique look :)

I like the unique. Thanks!

 

I'm a SFF (and Art Deco) nut and this pic made me happy 'downstairs' :P Epic work so far as usual Mr SlipperySkip

 

 

Thanks. Check out these photos....

....

 

029.jpg

 

030.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

    Chatbox
    There's a thing here. Somehow it moved to the top of the page, but I didn't do it. No, really! But still, Cheaps is likely to blame...
    You don't have permission to chat.
×