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Found 2 results

  1. Introduction Hello everybody! Time has come for another project to start. I wanted to do a unique build, something thathas never been seen before and as I was walking around the house looking at old stuff I noticed the beauty that would be housing this project, for all you radio lovers, it's a Grundig 4066 radio made in Germany in the late 50's. This project will be mostly used as a regular daily driver PC and some light photoshop use, it's entitled to my cousin that has been really nice to me helping me take the final pictures for my latest build Chernobyl, if you haven't seen this project you can read the logs here: http://www.overclock.net/t/1543761/project-chernobyl-from-beginning-to-the-end http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/322976-project-chernobyl/ And also giving me her Nikon D40x camera to take pictures in this project! Speaking of my latest project, Chernobyl will actually be recieveing a makeover sometime next week where I will be replacing some watercooling stuff and redoing some details like cables and such. But enough of that, you'll have to read that in the Chernobyl buildlog. I completely understand that some of you will be a bit annoyed or even furious that I will be "ripping" apart such a pretty old radio but it no longer is required and will just start to collect dust so I decided to give it new life instead, if you're wondering about the history. The radio has been in my family many years originally from my grandfather, and I did not want it to be forgotten. That's why I gave this project the name, Vintage Reborn. Components All components are not decided yet but I will be updating this list as the components get updated. PSU: Bitfenix Fury 550GMOBO: MSI Z97i ACCPU: Intel i5 4690kRAM: 16GB HyperX FurySSD: Samsung 850 EVO 120gbHDD: WD Green 2TBCPU Cooling: BeQuiet Dark Rock Pro 3Case Cooling: Bitfenix Spectre ProLighting: Bitfenix Alchemy LED strips Big News Bitfenix has jumped in and decided to sponsor this build. A big thanks to Bitfenix for supplying me with things for my build. I will be covering their sponsorship a bit more in detail as the project goes on. So let's get to work! I decided to start with showing of the radio before disassembly and also show of what Bitfenix provided me. Ofcourse I am still pretty new regarding photography so please bare with me if I got some bad angles etc, but I promise you they will become better as the build continues. Here we have some pictures of what Bitfenix provided me with. I must say that being sleeving directly from the factory, Nanosleeve is one of the best premade sleeved cables I've seen actually, it feels quite soft and not as "plastic" feely as other factory sleevings. And ofcourse I have to show a wide picture of the radio and some components Excuse me for the photobombing but I really wanted to showcase all of the aspects of the radio, now onwards to what I've planned for the PC itself. The project is expected to be finished by mid summer so it might take a while before you start seeing components dropping in but that does not mean we will be taking it nice and easy, full speed ahead! I wanted to keep the Retro feel in the PC so I decided to simply not show the IO or the PSU back cover that you normally would find on the back of the PC, instead I will be using some wonderful things called Panelmounts. You simply extend the cable and mount it on the outside of something sort of the way most PC cases have on their front panel. Unfortunately I haven't got a lot of time to work with during this week and the coming because I have my main rig Chernobyl to redo and a lot of studies. I started picking apart the radio and I can say this right from the start, it wasn't a pleasent experience. The radio hadn't been opened since the purchase which meant I had about 50 years of dust to deal with. very well, onwards. The radio is completely disassembled and I started planning where to drill and where to cut holes for all the panel mounts and I also started deciding the component layout inside the radio itself. Here's a picture of how the radio looks without all the trim. Also an early version of what the drilled holes will look like REMEMBER This is not the final product as I still have a lot of touch ups to make the holes look nicer. The project will be a bit dry on updates for the first weeks as I have a lot to deal with right now but I assure you I will update the log as soon as I've got time for it, ofcourse you should not have to wait. Here we have some renders in the early stage of the radio that I rendered using Visualizer. All models were made using the program Sketchup. Sadly this is all for this update but more will be coming next week! Stay tuned <3
  2. Hi everyone, started this build in Feb 2013 but would like to share it with you guys. Some of you will have seen the build already but hope you don't mind me adding a build log here too. My original idea was to convert an old radio into a custom PC case. Having no previous modding experience, my original plans were fairly modest but the more I have been exposed to the modding community the more your fantastic builds have inspired me to improve my designs and alter my goals. Anyway, on to the build... The first thing to do, and the most important by far, was to find a suitable radio cabinet. This actually proved easier than I thought and after a couple of enquiries I sourced a 1939 Murphy D72 valve radio. The cabinet was pretty shabby but was a nice size for what I wanted it for. First job was to strip everything down and refinish the walnut veneer exterior. Original speaker cloth was shot so got hold of some reproduction Fender cloth. Glued it onto the mount ready for installation. Projects are never without problems. The alloy of the speaker bezel had deteriorated so much that the bezel disintegrated upon removal leaving me with a serious headache. Being over 70 years old it was impossible to get a replacement part so a new one would have to be fabricated. I explored a number of ideas including aluminium fabrication and 3D printing but it was going to be prohibitively expensive (as a married father of two such expense can't be justified). Eventually I found a second hand router going cheap so made my own by means of a homemade circle jig and a lot of patience! New bezel painted alongside tuning dial bezel. The original plan was to convert the two large control knobs into bespoke USB sticks which would plug into a couple of USB ports in the front but this idea soon to be usurped in favour of volume and fan controls. I always envisioned having rotary power and reset switches to retain the feel of the original radio. Rotary momentary switches however have proved extraordinarily difficult to source. Eventually I found these rotary limit switches which, although rather large, could be modified to work nicely. To complete the switchgear I bought a cheap Antec fan controller and a Griffin Powermate which were modified slightly to take the original bakelite knobs.
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